Fisheries & Oysters

Oysters are hard little workers. Each one of these amazing bivalves can filter pollutants out of up to 50 gallons of water per day. Unfortunately, they are at just one percent of their historic population in the Chesapeake Bay. Oysters are a keystone species. Without a healthy oyster population, it is nearly impossible to restore the health of the Bay.  Waterkeepers on both shores of the Chesapeake Bay are seeking public policy that balances the needs of restoration with commercial fishery interests. Even with information gleaned from a five-year Oyster Advisory Commission study— and a requirement from the General Assembly (in the form of 2016 legislation) — to follow the science on oyster fisheries management, the commission responsible for managing oysters and the Maryland Department of Natural Resources have been unfairly tipping the scales toward industry.

Latest Posts
Town Hall: Global Pandemic Impacts on Local Oyster Industry & Fisheries

Town Hall: Global Pandemic Impacts on Local Oyster Industry & Fisheries

When Maryland’s governor issued stay at home orders and closed non-essential businesses, the owner of the Conowingo Dam unnecessarily elected ...
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Bay Journal: Mercury widespread in Chesapeake Bay headwaters fish

Bay Journal: Mercury widespread in Chesapeake Bay headwaters fish

Mercury widespread in Chesapeake Bay headwaters fish, Bay Journal, Jeremy Cox, June 30, 2020 Because methylmercury levels intensify with each ...
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Exelon Disregards Conowingo Dam License Conditions, Endangers Migratory Fish Populations

Exelon Disregards Conowingo Dam License Conditions, Endangers Migratory Fish Populations

Exelon, owner of the Conowingo Dam, while seeking a 50-year federal license renewal, blatantly disregarded conditions of its current license ...
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