Thursday 22 February 2018

Press Statements (61)

We are Waterkeepers Chesapeake, 19 Waterkeepers, Coastkeepers and Shorekeepers from around the Chesapeake and Coastal Bays region. From our family to yours, Happy Thanksgiving!   
PRESS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:                                                                                                                            October 21, 2016                                                                                                                     Contact: Carol ParenzanMiddle Susquehanna Riverkeeper Middle Susquehanna Riverkeeper Carol Parenzan on the 55,000 gallon oil spill in Lycoming County, PA In the wake of severe flooding in Central Pennsylvania, an 80-year-old pipeline burst early Friday morning, leaking upwards of 55,000 gallons of gasoline into Loyalsock Creek, in Gamble Township, northeast of Williamsport. By mid-day Friday, the spill was working its way into the West Branch of the Susquehanna River. Carol Parenzan, Middle Susquehanna Riverkeeper, said that witnesses who contacted her office said the “smell of petroleum is so thick you can taste it.” Parenzan said that downstream drinking water is being monitored and precautions for public safety are being put in place. In Milton, just north of Lewisburg, the water plant operated by Pennsylvania American Water, is filling water storage tanks and preparing to shut down drinking water should the spill reach intakes for the water plant.    Meanwhile, local and state agencies and emergency crews are having difficulty reaching the break due to high-water conditions, which happened on Wallis Run Road in Lycoming County. “High water and flooding has taken a bridge out in the area,” Parenzan said. “A liquid fuel pipeline in the vicinity was originally exposed during 2011 flooding. When we don’t adequately address aging infrastructure, it is only a matter of time before calamity happens. The time for the Susquehanna River apparently arrived today in the form of this broken pipeline and spill.” Parenzan said that the area is closed to…
Press Statement: James River Association Objects to Draft Permit to Dewater Coal Ash Ponds at Dominion’s Chesterfield Power Station Richmond (July 22, 2016): Yesterday, the James River Association (JRA) joined with the Southern Environmental Law Center and citizens from across the watershed to express concerns to the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) over the terms of a draft permit to dewater coal ash ponds at Dominion’s Chesterfield Power Station on the James River. JRA believes that the draft permit falls short in adequately protecting the river, the species that rely on it and the citizens that live within its watershed. The dewatering process is the first step in closing the coal ash ponds at Chesterfield, which hold over 280 million gallons of wastewater. “We must ensure that all wastewater is treated to meet water quality standards prior to discharge into the river,” said Jamie Brunkow, Lower James Riverkeeper for James River Association. Pollution limits in the draft permit are currently not protective of public health and aquatic life – including the federally endangered Atlantic sturgeon. The draft permit relies on a mixing zone to dilute wastewater, which includes harmful levels of metals such as arsenic, lead or chromium. The permit also allows Dominion to discharge cooling water at excessively hot temperatures – as high as 129 o F according to Dominion’s discharge monitoring reports. Chesterfield Power Station is adjacent to a portion of the James River where federally endangered Atlantic sturgeon are known to spawn. “The combined effects of toxic pollution and hot water discharge at Chesterfield Power Station pose serious threats to sturgeon and…