Friday 24 November 2017

Pipelines & Compressor Stations (14)

PRESS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:                                                                                                                            October 21, 2016                                                                                                                     Contact: Carol ParenzanMiddle Susquehanna Riverkeeper Middle Susquehanna Riverkeeper Carol Parenzan on the 55,000 gallon oil spill in Lycoming County, PA In the wake of severe flooding in Central Pennsylvania, an 80-year-old pipeline burst early Friday morning, leaking upwards of 55,000 gallons of gasoline into Loyalsock Creek, in Gamble Township, northeast of Williamsport. By mid-day Friday, the spill was working its way into the West Branch of the Susquehanna River. Carol Parenzan, Middle Susquehanna Riverkeeper, said that witnesses who contacted her office said the “smell of petroleum is so thick you can taste it.” Parenzan said that downstream drinking water is being monitored and precautions for public safety are being put in place. In Milton, just north of Lewisburg, the water plant operated by Pennsylvania American Water, is filling water storage tanks and preparing to shut down drinking water should the spill reach intakes for the water plant.    Meanwhile, local and state agencies and emergency crews are having difficulty reaching the break due to high-water conditions, which happened on Wallis Run Road in Lycoming County. “High water and flooding has taken a bridge out in the area,” Parenzan said. “A liquid fuel pipeline in the vicinity was originally exposed during 2011 flooding. When we don’t adequately address aging infrastructure, it is only a matter of time before calamity happens. The time for the Susquehanna River apparently arrived today in the form of this broken pipeline and spill.” Parenzan said that the area is closed to…
Federal agency stifling public participation by withholding information A coalition of 17 conservation groups is calling on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to revise or supplement its draft environmental impact statement (DEIS) for the proposed Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline. The groups note that FERC has continued a pattern of failing to disclose key information to the public about proposed pipelines and their considerable impacts. To build the Atlantic Sunrise, the Transcontinental Pipe Line Company (Transco) proposes to construct nearly 200 miles of large diameter pipeline through ten Pennsylvania counties. The pipeline would move fracked gas from northern Pennsylvania to an existing pipeline in Lancaster County. The gas would then be shipped to the southeast and Gulf Coast regions. “It is clear that FERC published the draft environmental impact statement before it had even received the information it needs to conduct a thorough review of this massive pipeline project,” said Barbara Arrindell, Director of Damascus Citizens for Sustainability. “FERC readily admits it still needs information about impacts on hundreds of proposed waterbody and wetlands crossings. This crucial information should have been included in the DEIS so the public has the opportunity to review and provide feedback during the public comment period. You certainly cannot comprehend the cumulative impact of a project without this type of information.” Two federal agencies also criticized FERC for the lack of information in the Atlantic Sunrise DEIS. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) said FERC ignored impacts on important resources including public water supplies, endangered species, and historic resources,…
Congratulations to the Gunpowder Riverkeeper Theaux Gardeur for ensuring that Columbia Gas Transmission, LLC will conduct fish sampling required by a recent settlement agreement.  On March 16th, the Circuit Court for Baltimore County entered a settlement resolving litigation among the Gunpowder Riverkeeper, Columbia, and the Maryland Department of the Environment over a 21 mile natural gas pipeline that Columbia is constructing from Baltimore County to Harford County.  The pipeline will cross 81 streams that collectively provide drinking water to approximately 1.8 million residents in the Baltimore area and support sensitive trout species.  As part of the settlement, Columbia agreed to conduct fish sampling at five streams before they are crossed by the pipeline.  A primary purpose of this “before” sampling is to provide baseline data that will allow the Riverkeeper and the public to more precisely understand the water quality impacts that result from the construction activities.  Columbia obtained a permit from the Department of Natural Resources to conduct the sampling, but standard DNR protocol requires this type of work to occur after June 1.  Not wanting to delay their construction project by approximately 30 days, Columbia asked the Gunpowder Riverkeeper to agree to waive the sampling requirement.  The Riverkeeper said no, and filed an emergency motion with the court to enforce the settlement.  In response to that motion, Columbia agreed to alter its construction schedule and to perform the sampling. The Gunpowder Riverkeeper’s refusal to back down ensures that important data will be gathered, and it sends a clear message…