Thursday 29 June 2017

Pipelines & Compressor Stations (8)

The proposed 600-mile fracked gas Atlantic Coast Pipeline (ACP) is on its way to being built – unless we all work together to stop this unnecessary and economically and environmentally devastating project. Under the new federal administration, this pipeline will be expedited and built as quickly as possible – despite overwhelming local opposition. We need to act now and submit comments by April 6th. Not surprisingly, given Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s (FERC) history of rubberstamping pipeline projects, it concluded that any impacts on the environment could be mitigated so that “the majority of project effects would be reduced to less-than-significant levels.” Now is the time for people to comment on FERC’s grossly inadequate and incomplete draft environmental impact statement (DEIS). The burden is on FERC to fully investigate the environmental risks and costs associated with the ACP, including all new and supplemental information. FERC has not done this. In addition to FERC approval, in order for the ACP to be built across national forest lands, the US Forest Service must issue a special use permit and amend both national forest management plans for the George Washington and Monongahela National Forests. The public can submit comments on the DEIS to FERC by April 6th, including comments on the request to the Forest Service for a special use permit. There are several ways to do this. The fastest and easiest is by signing this petition and we will submit it to FERC. Please submit comments by April 6th. Do it today by…
PRESS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:                                                                                                                            October 21, 2016                                                                                                                     Contact: Carol ParenzanMiddle Susquehanna Riverkeeper Middle Susquehanna Riverkeeper Carol Parenzan on the 55,000 gallon oil spill in Lycoming County, PA In the wake of severe flooding in Central Pennsylvania, an 80-year-old pipeline burst early Friday morning, leaking upwards of 55,000 gallons of gasoline into Loyalsock Creek, in Gamble Township, northeast of Williamsport. By mid-day Friday, the spill was working its way into the West Branch of the Susquehanna River. Carol Parenzan, Middle Susquehanna Riverkeeper, said that witnesses who contacted her office said the “smell of petroleum is so thick you can taste it.” Parenzan said that downstream drinking water is being monitored and precautions for public safety are being put in place. In Milton, just north of Lewisburg, the water plant operated by Pennsylvania American Water, is filling water storage tanks and preparing to shut down drinking water should the spill reach intakes for the water plant.    Meanwhile, local and state agencies and emergency crews are having difficulty reaching the break due to high-water conditions, which happened on Wallis Run Road in Lycoming County. “High water and flooding has taken a bridge out in the area,” Parenzan said. “A liquid fuel pipeline in the vicinity was originally exposed during 2011 flooding. When we don’t adequately address aging infrastructure, it is only a matter of time before calamity happens. The time for the Susquehanna River apparently arrived today in the form of this broken pipeline and spill.” Parenzan said that the area is closed to…
Federal agency stifling public participation by withholding information A coalition of 17 conservation groups is calling on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to revise or supplement its draft environmental impact statement (DEIS) for the proposed Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline. The groups note that FERC has continued a pattern of failing to disclose key information to the public about proposed pipelines and their considerable impacts. To build the Atlantic Sunrise, the Transcontinental Pipe Line Company (Transco) proposes to construct nearly 200 miles of large diameter pipeline through ten Pennsylvania counties. The pipeline would move fracked gas from northern Pennsylvania to an existing pipeline in Lancaster County. The gas would then be shipped to the southeast and Gulf Coast regions. “It is clear that FERC published the draft environmental impact statement before it had even received the information it needs to conduct a thorough review of this massive pipeline project,” said Barbara Arrindell, Director of Damascus Citizens for Sustainability. “FERC readily admits it still needs information about impacts on hundreds of proposed waterbody and wetlands crossings. This crucial information should have been included in the DEIS so the public has the opportunity to review and provide feedback during the public comment period. You certainly cannot comprehend the cumulative impact of a project without this type of information.” Two federal agencies also criticized FERC for the lack of information in the Atlantic Sunrise DEIS. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) said FERC ignored impacts on important resources including public water supplies, endangered species, and historic resources,…