Friday 22 June 2018

Clean Water Advocacy (25)

The Waterkeepers and Riverkeepers in our coalition are vigilantly working to make the waters of the Chesapeake and Coastal Bays swimmable and fishable. Together, the Waterkeepers Chesapeake network patrols thousands of miles of tributaries and shorelines throughout the Chesapeake and Coastal Bays, and are at the forefront of water quality related enforcement and advocacy efforts in Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania. Earlier this month we shared our legislative victories in Maryland. Here’s what you need to know about the 2018 Virginia and Pennsylvania (so far) legislative sessions. In Virginia, from January to March this year the James Riverkeeper and others worked hard to protect oyster sanctuaries across the state. Fortunately, they were successful in defeating a bill which would have placed these invaluable sanctuaries at risk (for the second year in a row!). Next week, Virginia will be considering its state budget - with a proposal from Governor McAuliffe that supports the Virginia Land Conservation Foundation, Virginia Outdoors Foundation and Environmental Education. There are also multiple proposals from the Senate, like $20 million for the Stormwater Local Assistance Fund and funding for oyster restoration and replenishment, that we are supportive of. Find out more about the Virginia’s budget proposals here.   Potomac Riverkeeper joined James Riverkeeper to address the threats associated with coal ash in the Virginia legislature. They successfully advocated for the passage of Senate Bill 807, which prevents the Virginia Department from Environmental Quality (DEQ) from issuing any new coal ash solid waste permits at Dominion until July 1, 2019.…

Maryland’s 2018 Legislative Session Wrap-Up Featured

With the 2018 Maryland Session coming to a close earlier this month, we’d like to let you know about the important legislative victories we achieved along with some of the policies we may revisit in 2019. Over the past few months, Waterkeepers Chesapeake partnered with Maryland waterkeepers and other environmental organizations in the General Assembly to increase public access to government records, increase public participation at the Public Service Commission (PSC), prevent the use of harmful chemicals, decrease the amount of foam in local waterways, and close loopholes under current law that enable the net loss of forests in Maryland -- to name a few.   Legislative Victories Thanks to the work of Fair Farms and others, we were able to secure funding for the Maryland Farms and Families program.The Maryland General Assembly included $200,000 in the final budget for this program that matches purchases made by low-income Marylanders using federal nutrition assistance like SNAP (food stamps) at participating farmers markets. While the Governor still needs to allocate the funds for this program -- you can ask him to do so here -- we are now one step closer to having Maryland fund a successful program that directly supports small farmers, food-insecure Marylanders, and our local economy. This past session the General Assembly also legalized hemp production in Maryland. Hemp has a number of benefits for our environment, provides a new income stream for farmers, diversifies our state’s agricultural system, and may bring new jobs and opportunities to Maryland. You…
Waterkeepers Chesapeake Joins Over 115 Waterkeeper Organizations and Other Groups In Opposition to Repeal of the Clean Water Rule In 2015, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Army Corps (Corps) of Engineers passed the Clean Water Rule, resulting in a victory for a variety of streams, ponds, and wetlands that were vulnerable to pollution. Waterkeepers Chesapeake submitted comments that were supportive of the rule’s passage. The Rule was based on sound science and received broad public support. The Clean Water Rule was part of a larger effort to clarify the definition of “waters of the United States” (WOTUS) under the Clean Water Act. How WOTUS is defined is important because any waterway that meets the WOTUS definition receives Clean Water Act (CWA) protections. Under the Rule’s updated definition of WOTUS, CWA protections would extend to the drinking water sources of 117 million people across the United States – every one in three Americans.   Despite this – earlier this year, President Trump urged the EPA to repeal the 2015 Clean Water Rule. This rule would rollback the new definition adopted in 2015, reverting us back to the less protective definitions of WOTUS that have been in place since the 1970s. Waterkeepers Chesapeake joined over one hundred other Waterkeeper organizations across the United States in signing onto Waterkeeper Alliance’s comments on these detrimental rollbacks. Waterkeeper Alliance took a comprehensive look at the EPA’s proposed rescinding of the rule and found that it violates requirements under the Clean Water Act,…